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Moose

A note appeared in the British Chess Magazine June 1976 (p.270) announcing my magazine Chessics which came out in May that year. The first article in Chessics introduced the Moose, which hops over a piece in line with it laterally or diagonally but turns 45 to right or left over the hurdle. In the original article the M was shown by a left-turned Q symbol, but in a later article in Chessics issue 9 October 1980, introducing the related pieces Eagle, Sparrow and Hamster, the inverted rook symbol was proposed (so that GMESH are represented as inverted QRBNP). Several of the first set of problems proved to be flawed but were later corrected. I hope the versions shown here are now sound.

To see the solution, run the cursor over the blank area.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976 (version)
Moose.
Mate in 2.

The 'Mate' stipulation means that White and Black move alternately and White seeks to checkmate the Black king in the stated number of moves, against whatever moves Black may choose to make.

Solution
1.Kf8
1...Me4 2.Mc3 (retaining guard on f5)
1...Mf5 2.Mg7 (retaining guard on e4)
1...Me1 2.Be3

Only one White first move (the 'key' move) will solve the problem, and there must be at least one White mating move in reply to every Black move.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976 (version)
Moose.
Mate in 2.

Solution
1.Rc2
1...Kd3 2.Mf2
1...Ke3 2.Re2
1...Mf2+ 2.Rc4
Not 1...Mf4 (selfcheck)

An improved version with set play should be possible.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976 (version)
Moose.
Mate in 3.

Solution
1.Mh6 (retaining guard on d5)
1...d3 2.Kg6 (releasing stalemate)
2...Kd5 3.Kf5 (discovered check by M)

A version of the Indian Theme, which is characterised by White making a move that avoids giving stalemate, so that checkmate can later be given.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976
Moose
Helpmate in 2
(a) diagram, (b) Pf2-e2

The 'Helpmate' stipulation means Black and White move alternately (Black first) and they cooperate in trying to reach a checkmate of the Black king in the specified number of moves.

Solution
(a) 1.f1^R Mc5 2.Rf7 d6
(b) 1.e1^M Mg4 2.Mf6 e6.

I call this the Pawn Pair Theme.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976 (version)
Moose
Helpmate in 3

Solution
1.Kc8 Kb6 2.Rd8 Md2 3.Mb8 Bg4
Neither M nor R can interpose at d7.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976 (version)
Moose.
Helpmate in 3
(a) diagram, (b) b6-d7

In a 'Helpmate' if one player checks then the other must rescue the checked king. the cooperative play does not extend to leaving kings undefended.

Solution (a)
1.Bh2 Mh2 2.Bb7 Me7 3.Rb8 Kb6 Discovered double check by 2 moose over mobile hurdles.

Solution (b)
1.Ba7 Ma6 2.Rb8 Kd7 3.Bb7 Mc7 Direct double check by 1 moose over 2 mobile hurdles.

Hint: look for double check mates.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976 (version)
Moose
Helpmate in 4

Solution
1.Mc2 Ke5 2.Me1 Kd4 3.Kd1 Kc3 4.d2 Kb2 (discovered check by M)

This was originally a longer helpmate but had to be cut shorter due to unsoundness. A better version should be possible.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976 (version)
Moose.
Helpdoublestalemate in 12

The stipulation 'Helpdoublestalemate' means Black and White move alternately, cooperating to reach a position where Black is stalemated and White would also be stalemated if it were White's turn to move.

Solution
1.Ke3 b4 2.Kd4 b5 3.Kc5 ba6 4.b5 Ke6 5.Kb6 Kd5 6.b4 Kc4 7.Ka7 Kb3 8.Ma8 Ka2 9.Mb6 Ma1 10.Ka8 Mb3 11.ba3 (check by M over M) Ka1 12.a2 a7 (mutually pinned mooses).

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976
Moose Chess
(i.e. pawns may promote to Moose)
Serieshelpmate in 9

The 'Serieshelpmate' stipulation means that Black makes a series of the specified number of moves (while White stands still) seeking to reach a position where White (now permitted to move) can checkmate the Black king in one move. During the series-play Black may not check White except on the last move.

Solution
1-5.a1^M 6.Ra2 7.Rh2 8.Mg2 9.Bh3 for b8^M (immobilised R)

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976
Moose.
Seriesselfmate in 11

The 'Seriesselfmate' stipulation means that White makes a series of moves (while Black stands still) seeking to reach a position where Black, now allowed to move, must checkmate the White king.

Solution
1.d3 2.Ke3 (still shielding BK from Mb6 check) 3-7.d8^R 8.Rd4 (taking over shielding duty from WK) 9.Kd2 10.Kd1 11.Rd2 for Me3 (double check mate)

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976 (version)
Moose
Reflexmate in 6

The 'Reflexmate' stipulation means that White moves first and seeks to get the white king checkmated by Black, assisted by the fact that Black is obliged to checkmate in one move if able to do so, and hampered (sometimes) by the fact that White is similarly obliged to checkmate Black in one if able.

Solution
1.Mf2-c4 h6 2.Kg6 h5 3.Mg7 h4 4.Kh7 h3 5.Kh8 h2 6.Md3 hg1^M

Mate by black M acting over immobilised white M.

G. P. Jelliss
Chessics #1, 1976
Moose
Minimummer Selfmate in 13

The 'Selfmate' stipulation means that White makes the first move and seeks to get the white king checkmated by Black. The 'Minimummer' condition means Black is restricted to making his shortest possible move.

Solution
1.a8^Q Kg5 2.Qe4 g6 3.Rh3 Mh2 (minimum length move!) 4.Qe5 Kg4 5.Rh8 g5 6.Qb8 Ma8 (even longer minimum move!) 7.Rh4 Kh4 8.Qh2 Kg4 9.Rf3 Kf3 10.Qe5 g4 11.Kf1 g3 12.Kg1 g2 13.Qg3 Kg3 (Q is created on the first move and destroyed on the last).

One of the themes of the composition is to bring about very long minimummer moves.

G. P. Jelliss
Christmas/New Year Card xii/89
Moose. Mate in 4

Solution
1. Md7 (threat 2. Mg5‡ 2... f4? is still check) 1... f4 2. Qe6‡
1... Bd2 2. Qd4‡ so: 1... h6 2. Mc5† Rc4 3. Qe6†
3... Kf4 4.Qe3‡ (M guards g4)
3... Kd4 4. Mb3‡ (double check over two moveable hurdles)
3...Be5 4.Qc4‡ (M prevents Bd4 interposition)